Mary's Sweet Bread
10 Mark Street
Pawcatuck, CT 06379
(860) 599-0340

Mary's Sweet Bread

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DateNameSource Category
2/2/2009Farmers' markets crop up in the areaThe Stonington-Mystic Times From freshly picked strawberries to home-baked pastries, the recently opened farmer’s market... Newspaper Articles
2/2/2009Baking Bread to Make DoughThe Stonington Times Pawcatuck -- On a hot, humid day, when most are finding solace in a swimming pool or air-con... Newspaper Articles
4/3/2008A Sour Ending to a Sweet Thing? Mary’s Sweet Bread bakery struggles to stay openThe Stonington Times Tucked away on an unassuming side street along the Pawcatuck River, on the bottom floor of a... Newspaper Articles
8/17/2007Farmers' market offers more than produceThe Westerly Pawcatuck Press WESTERLY - Drive along Main Street from Friday to Wednesday during the summer and you’ll see... Newspaper Articles
7/25/2007Doesn’t Come FresherThe Providence Journal-Bulletin WESTERLY Going to the Westerly-Pawcatuck Farmers Market is like visiting the garden to see w... Newspaper Articles
7/17/2007Free Samples Banned At Farmers' MarketThe Day Stonington — No more free slices of Portuguese sweet bread. No more tastes of salsa and dip.... Newspaper Articles
7/2/2006Baking A Loaf, Making A LivingThe Day Marketplace Raised in a traditional Portuguese family, Mary Soares' life revolved around what was happen... Newspaper Articles
4/16/2003Resurrection of a family traditionThe Day It was a ritual when Mary Mattos Soares made her Portuguese sweet bread. Every detail had... Newspaper Articles
5/17/1987FARE OF THE COUNTRY: Sweet Bread, Portuguese StyleThe New York Times Some Sunday mornings in the country, when work does not call, we set out the margarine, the ... Newspaper Articles
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2/2/2009 The Stonington-Mystic Times
Farmers' markets crop up in the area
From freshly picked strawberries to home-baked pastries, the recently opened farmer’s markets in Mystic seem to have it all. Familie... (more)
2/2/2009 The Stonington Times
Baking Bread to Make Dough
Pawcatuck -- On a hot, humid day, when most are finding solace in a swimming pool or air-conditioned room, Mary Soares, "the bread l... (more)
4/3/2008 The Stonington Times
A Sour Ending to a Sweet Thing? Mary’s Sweet Bread bakery struggles to stay open
Tucked away on an unassuming side street along the Pawcatuck River, on the bottom floor of an average-looking house, there is a bake... (more)
8/17/2007 The Westerly Pawcatuck Press
Farmers' market offers more than produce
WESTERLY - Drive along Main Street from Friday to Wednesday during the summer and you’ll see the same old brick buildings and be met... (more)
7/25/2007 The Providence Journal-Bulletin
Doesn’t Come Fresher
WESTERLY Going to the Westerly-Pawcatuck Farmers Market is like visiting the garden to see what’s ready to pick. Except there are... (more)
7/17/2007 The Day
Free Samples Banned At Farmers' Market
Stonington — No more free slices of Portuguese sweet bread. No more tastes of salsa and dip. No more chunks of fresh tomato. No more... (more)
7/2/2006 The Day Marketplace
Baking A Loaf, Making A Living
Raised in a traditional Portuguese family, Mary Soares' life revolved around what was happening inside the four walls of her parents... (more)
4/16/2003 The Day
Resurrection of a family tradition
It was a ritual when Mary Mattos Soares made her Portuguese sweet bread. Every detail had to be just right. Her husband and si... (more)
5/17/1987 The New York Times
FARE OF THE COUNTRY: Sweet Bread, Portuguese Style
Some Sunday mornings in the country, when work does not call, we set out the margarine, the strawberry jam and the apple butter, and... (more)

Free Samples Banned At Farmers' Market

Stonington sanitarian cites health concerns; some upset by ruling

By Joe Wojtas
Filed under: Newspaper Articles
The Day
7/17/2007

Stonington — No more free slices of Portuguese sweet bread. No more tastes of salsa and dip. No more chunks of fresh tomato. No more free samples of any kind. That's what customers at the weekly Stonington Farmers Market at the Town Dock discovered Saturday when they strolled along the tables set up by vendors. They could buy items but couldn't taste them first. The ban was the result of a report by a state health department epidemiologist who happened to visit the market as a customer two weeks ago. He was concerned about the safety of the free samples, such as dip in bowls, and items such as coffee and lemonade that were being sold. He notified Town Sanitarian Karen Weiss. Weiss then told market organizer Stuart Vyse last week that vendors could not give out free samples or sell non-farm items to eat on the town property because that violated rules she had set for the market two years ago. Weiss said those guidelines reflect the state Department of Agriculture's idea for the markets, which is to sell products grown on a farm or produced on a farm such as cheese or pies. She said the rules do not allow cooking, preparation of food, or the sale of other items such as the coffee and lemonade. “Some of the things being done down there are not what the Department of Agriculture is promoting,” she said. “Open containers of food are a concern anywhere.” Weiss said she and First Selectman William Brown will meet with Vyse on Wednesday to work out a solution for the rest of the season, which ends Oct. 13. After that, she said, they will work on a plan for the future. But Brown said Monday he thought, pending the meeting with Vyse, that the market would be able to continue operating as it has in the past and give out free samples. “There's no reason to make a change. There's no health hazard down there,” he said. One vendor not happy with Saturday's decision was Mary Soares, who makes Portuguese sweet bread with farm products. She has sold the bread at the market since it began 10 years ago. “When you try to describe your product to someone, whether it's my bread or someone's goat cheese, it's so much easier to just tell them, 'Try it,' ” Soares said. “It works for me. They walk away eating a slice and then they do a three-sixty. They come back to my table and I got a customer.” Without being able to hand out samples, Soares said it was difficult to get new customers on Saturday. She said many people who come to the market look forward to munching on a slice of her bread while they walk among the vendors. “I told them I can't give out any samples,” she said. “I was tempted to just cut them a slice and see what happened.” Soares said she sees no difference between samples at the market and those given out at grocery stores and the mall. Those locations, however, are subject to regular inspections. Soares said she holds a bakery license and the market vendors have insurance. As for why events such as the Blessing of the Fleet and the Village Fair can sell food, Weiss said those events are temporary in nature and do obtain a permit. If the market wants to sell coffee, lemonade and other food, she said additional approvals would be needed from the town. Vyse said he is worried the market could lose vendors because of the policy. He said the vendors participate in other markets across the state where they are allowed to hand out free samples. “It seems to me there are ways it can be done if the local folks are willing to work with us,” he said. “Hopefully we can work something out.” The market is sponsored by the nonprofit Village Improvement Association, which sells the coffee that was banned on Saturday. Vyse serves on its board. “We do this as a gift to the community. It's become a highlight of Stonington summers,” he said. “We wouldn't want anything to hurt it.”