Mary's Sweet Bread
10 Mark Street
Pawcatuck, CT 06379
(860) 599-0340

Mary's Sweet Bread

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DateNameSource Category
2/2/2009Farmers' markets crop up in the areaThe Stonington-Mystic Times From freshly picked strawberries to home-baked pastries, the recently opened farmer’s market... Newspaper Articles
2/2/2009Baking Bread to Make DoughThe Stonington Times Pawcatuck -- On a hot, humid day, when most are finding solace in a swimming pool or air-con... Newspaper Articles
4/3/2008A Sour Ending to a Sweet Thing? Mary’s Sweet Bread bakery struggles to stay openThe Stonington Times Tucked away on an unassuming side street along the Pawcatuck River, on the bottom floor of a... Newspaper Articles
8/17/2007Farmers' market offers more than produceThe Westerly Pawcatuck Press WESTERLY - Drive along Main Street from Friday to Wednesday during the summer and you’ll see... Newspaper Articles
7/25/2007Doesn’t Come FresherThe Providence Journal-Bulletin WESTERLY Going to the Westerly-Pawcatuck Farmers Market is like visiting the garden to see w... Newspaper Articles
7/17/2007Free Samples Banned At Farmers' MarketThe Day Stonington — No more free slices of Portuguese sweet bread. No more tastes of salsa and dip.... Newspaper Articles
7/2/2006Baking A Loaf, Making A LivingThe Day Marketplace Raised in a traditional Portuguese family, Mary Soares' life revolved around what was happen... Newspaper Articles
4/16/2003Resurrection of a family traditionThe Day It was a ritual when Mary Mattos Soares made her Portuguese sweet bread. Every detail had... Newspaper Articles
5/17/1987FARE OF THE COUNTRY: Sweet Bread, Portuguese StyleThe New York Times Some Sunday mornings in the country, when work does not call, we set out the margarine, the ... Newspaper Articles
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2/2/2009 The Stonington-Mystic Times
Farmers' markets crop up in the area
From freshly picked strawberries to home-baked pastries, the recently opened farmer’s markets in Mystic seem to have it all. Familie... (more)
2/2/2009 The Stonington Times
Baking Bread to Make Dough
Pawcatuck -- On a hot, humid day, when most are finding solace in a swimming pool or air-conditioned room, Mary Soares, "the bread l... (more)
4/3/2008 The Stonington Times
A Sour Ending to a Sweet Thing? Mary’s Sweet Bread bakery struggles to stay open
Tucked away on an unassuming side street along the Pawcatuck River, on the bottom floor of an average-looking house, there is a bake... (more)
8/17/2007 The Westerly Pawcatuck Press
Farmers' market offers more than produce
WESTERLY - Drive along Main Street from Friday to Wednesday during the summer and you’ll see the same old brick buildings and be met... (more)
7/25/2007 The Providence Journal-Bulletin
Doesn’t Come Fresher
WESTERLY Going to the Westerly-Pawcatuck Farmers Market is like visiting the garden to see what’s ready to pick. Except there are... (more)
7/17/2007 The Day
Free Samples Banned At Farmers' Market
Stonington — No more free slices of Portuguese sweet bread. No more tastes of salsa and dip. No more chunks of fresh tomato. No more... (more)
7/2/2006 The Day Marketplace
Baking A Loaf, Making A Living
Raised in a traditional Portuguese family, Mary Soares' life revolved around what was happening inside the four walls of her parents... (more)
4/16/2003 The Day
Resurrection of a family tradition
It was a ritual when Mary Mattos Soares made her Portuguese sweet bread. Every detail had to be just right. Her husband and si... (more)
5/17/1987 The New York Times
FARE OF THE COUNTRY: Sweet Bread, Portuguese Style
Some Sunday mornings in the country, when work does not call, we set out the margarine, the strawberry jam and the apple butter, and... (more)

Farmers' market offers more than produce

Market has moved to Westerly from across the river

By Leah Rocketto
Filed under: Newspaper Articles
The Westerly Pawcatuck Press
8/17/2007

WESTERLY - Drive along Main Street from Friday to Wednesday during the summer and you’ll see the same old brick buildings and be met with the same bumper-to-bumper beach traffic. Drive through downtown on a Thursday afternoon, and you’ll notice a slight change in scenery. You’ll notice several stands set up by vendors in a former used car lot selling a selection of products from kettle corn to organic produce, to natural herb products. These stands and vendors are part of the Westerly Farmer’s Market. This summer marks the market’s debut in Westerly. Originally it was held in Pawcatuck Park almost directly across the river. It was relocated due to construction in the park. Though the market may not have the typical country roadside location, its Main Street venue has only helped business. For first-time customer, Tobin Heminway, she was "just driving by" when she saw the market and decided to "pull in." "I was going to go to McQuades but it’s summer time and I love being outside," Heminway said as she shopped for vegetables with her daughter Arden. The idea of shopping in the sun is what initially attracts customers like Heminway. However, it is not what keeps them coming back. Most vendors agree that the fresh, organic produce keeps the regular customers. "You read ‘mono-something’ (on a store label) and you have to go look it up," said vendor Mary Soares. Soares, who sells her homemade Portuguese bread at the market, also noted "more and more people are looking for fresh, organic produce" and are "trying to get away from the artificial." Though the price of the produce at the farmer’s marker may be higher than the grocery store price, Soares believes "the quality is better." The produce, according to vendor Sherrill Janeiro, "changes from week to week due to availability." Despite the change, the market still has its top selling items, consisting of tomatoes, zucchinis, and cucumbers. However, vendors believe it’s the interaction between them and the customers that keep customers coming back. Soares believes the best part about the market is "meeting the customers." Soares added that the atmosphere of the farmer’s market is more "relaxed" compared to supermarkets and the people are "happier." Any passerby can notice what Soares is talking about. At the farmers market, no customer is busy with a blackberry and no vendor is staring at the clock, counting down the minutes for his or her shift to end. Everyone has a smile on their face and is part of a conversation. Soares and Janeiro hope that in addition to selling fresh produce, the farmer’s market can return the "small town feeling" to Westerly. "I think we need to go back to the old fashioned ways," Soares said, "from the way we cook to our interaction." On a personal level, Soares hopes the market will allow her to continue to carry on the tradition of bread making. She has all ready started to make that dream come true by taking her grandson, James Shabraekn, to the market with her every week. Sometimes, Shabraekn even runs the stand when Soares has to make a delivery. The family tradition, customer and vendor interaction, and fresh produce are available to all on Thursdays from noon to 4 p.m. until October.